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Education

CARDIOVASCULAR Webinars

Edition 2019 – The ESCR Educational Webinars are back in a new format!

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Different levels (Advanced/Basic)

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Starting time 18:00 CET

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2 speakers per webinar

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Interactive lectures

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Time for questions

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In cooperation with the ESCR Young Club

ABOUT THE WEBINARS

Description

The online lectures are held in English language and on set dates and time. The duration of each session is approximately 60 minutes. Two presenters and one moderator will be present during the session. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Participation

The ESCR Educational Webinars are free of charge and open for every active ESCR member.
Webinar places are limited and will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Early registration is recommended

Coordinators

C. Loewe, Vienna/AT
M. Francone, Rome/IT 
ESCR Office

For active ESCR members in good standing the recordings of the past Educational Webinars are available in the MyUserArea!

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Optimize your cardiac MR: How to avoid common problems/mistakes“
Moderator: Prof. Luigi Natale (Rome/IT)

"Setting up a CMR examination: standard workflow & sequences revisited"

Prof. Francesco Santini, Basel/CH

"How to avoid artifacts and pitfalls"

Prof. Ursula Reiter, Graz/AT

Lecture 1 - details

Description

Cardiac MRI examinations are usually time consuming, requiring a lot of expert intervention from the MR technician to properly plan and execute. While MR manufacturers and individual radiology departments continuously optimize the workflow, there are some aspects that could be potentially overlooked in a clinical setting. This presentation will focus on the following questions:

• Are we scanning the right patients? Proper screening of patients, especially with implanted active devices, is essential in the optimization of the scanning workflow.
• Are we using the right sequences? The most common sequences (bSSFP, STIR) might not be ideal in some cases.
• What does the future hold? Methods that will soon be available to optimize a cardiac MRI scan.

Learning Objectives

• Dealing with implanted active devices
• Alternative acquisition methods for common sequences
• Accelerated cardiac imaging

About the speaker

Dr. Santini studied Electronic Engineering with a specialization in Biomedical Engineering at the Università degli Studi di Firenze (Italy). He then moved to Basel and in 2009 gained a PhD degree in Biophysics (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in the Radiology Department (University of Basel). He then continued as a postdoctoral fellow and since 2013 Dr. Santini is responsible for MR Safety in the University Hospital in Basel. In 2015 he was among the first people to obtain the title of MR Safety Expert from the American Board of MR Safety, and helped draft the Swiss guidelines for MR Safety endorsed by the Swiss Society of Radiology. His research activities are in  the field of dynamic and quantitative MR imaging, applied to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems.

Dr. Santini is the author of more than 40 scientific publications and recipient of various research grants.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

CMR imaging represents the established reference standard method to quantify volumetric function, myocardial mass, shunts and regurgitation volumes, as well as myocardial fibrosis non-invasively. The fast and frequently irregular motion of the heart, however, renders CMR especially prone to imaging artefacts, which might not only lead to limited or undiagnostic image quality but – if not recognized – incorrect image interpretation and/or quantification of assessed parameters. The lecture aims to discuss strategies to identify and avoid CMR imaging artefacts potentially causing pitfalls.

Learning Objectives

• Artefacts and pitfalls in CMR volumetric function and blood flow
• Artefacts and pitfalls in morphological CMR imaging
• Artefacts and pitfalls in relaxation time mapping

About the speaker

Ursula Reiter received her diploma in Physics at the University of Technology Graz in 1993. During her PhD studies in the field of experimental and molecular laser physics she worked as university assistant at the University of Technology Graz. In 1998 he graduated from the University of Technology in Graz with distinction. In 1999 she started to work at the Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz. Since 2001 her professional and research focus lies on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and post-processing. She is author and co-author of numerous scientific papers, book contributions, books and patents. Ursula Reiter received her habilitation in Experimental and Theoretical Radiology at the Medical University of Graz in 2017.

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Basic

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Basic
Date: Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Optimize your cardiac MR: Cardiac MR optimization in daily clinical routine“
Young Club Moderator: Dr. Marco Gatti, Turin/IT

„My late enhancement does not work“: clinical examples, explanations and solutions

Prof. Matthias Gutberlet, Leipzig/DE

„My flow measurements are not correct“: clinical examples, explanations and solutions

Dr. Nicola Galea, Rome/IT

Lecture 1 - details

Description

Late Gadolinium Enhancement (LGE) sequences are one of the most frequently used sequences in Cardiac MR (CMR). Typical LGE patterns have been described, which may help in the differential diagnosis of Cardiac Diseases, especially in cardiomyopathies. But this knowledge only helps, if these techniques can be adequately used. Artefacts may mimic or mask disease. Therefore, adequate precautions against artefacts and misinterpretations have to be considered.

Learning Objectives

• To learn about the most important LGE patterns in CMR
• To learn how to avoid artefacts or misinterpretation of LGE
• To gather experience in using sequence solutions

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Family Name: GUTBERLET, Matthias
Title: MD, PhD, EBCR, Prof. Dr. med.
Present Position: Specialist in Radiology; Specialist in Nuclear Medicine.
Head of the Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Office Phone No.: +49-341-865-1702 Office Fax No.: +49-341-865-1803
e-mail: matthias.gutberlet@helios-kliniken.de
Office Address: Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
University Leipzig / Leipzig Heart Center
Strümpellstrasse 39
04289 Leipzig
GERMANY

Medical Graduation and Other Professional Training:
1985-1992 Philipps-University Marburg Medical School
1993 Doctor thesis in Orthopedics at Philipps-University Marburg
1992 – 1995 Residency in Cardiology (Prof. Fleck) German Heart Institute Berlin (DHZB)
1995 – 2000 Research fellowship and specialist training in Diagnostic Radiology,
Charité Berlin (Prof. Felix)
27/06/2000 End of specialist training in Radiology
(Facharztausbildung in „Diagnostischer Radiologie“)
04/00-04/02 Research fellowship in Nuclear Medicine (Prof. Eichstädt), Charité, Berlin
11/02 „Habilitation“ in Diagnostic Radiology (Assistant Professor of Radiology)
12/2003 End of specialist training in Nuclear Medicine
(Facharztausbildung in „Nuklearmedizin“)
7/2002 Senior Consultant in Diagnostic Radiology (CT/MRI/conventional radiology)
Since 16.08.07 Head of the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
University Leipzig / Leipzig Heart Center and
Professorship for Cardiovascular Imaging at the University of Leipzig

Research:
I was mainly involved in research projects dealing with Doppler-ultrasound, contrast agents, MDCT and MRI of the cardiovascular system, using the techniques of Dynamic CTA, Dual Energy, Iterative reconstruction, Coronary CTA, MR-angiography, MR-volumetry, MR flow-measurements and MR-perfusion in humans and animal models. I am one of the project leaders of the German Competence Network for Congenital Heart Disease since 2003.

Recent studies of our group were dealing with Dose Reduction in Coronary CTA, Imaging and Post-Processing before and after TAVI and EVAR, MR viability assessment in comparison to SPECT, PET, Cardiac MRI at 3.0T and studies on the assessment of myocarditis and other cardiomyopathies by MRI. Furthermore, we have gathered the first experiences in Cardiac PET/MR and MRI guided electrophysiology studies as well as the first atrial flutter ablation in man by using passive and active catheter tracking.

Selected Activities in Radiological Societies:
– President of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) 2014-2017
– President of the Working Group of Cardiovascular Imaging of the German Röntgen Society (DRG) since 5/2014
– Congress President of the 10th Scientific Meeting of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) 2009 in Leipzig from October 8th-10th
– Member of the European Board of Cardiac Radiology (EBCR) since 2011
– Q3-Adviser Cardiac CT and Cardiac MR of German Roentgen Society (DRG) since 2011

Number of Peer Reviewed Publications as indexed in PubMed: > 220

 

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Flow measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are required for the quantitative characterization of a large number of congenital and valvular diseases and in some cases play a pivotal role in the clinical decision-making process.
Phase-contrast MR sequences are widely available on the common MR scanners, easily executable and and quickly assessable; however, their acquisition and analysis can be the subject of multiple errors.
An accurate assessment of regurgitant or shunt flow may have a tremendous impact on clinical management and surgery indication and therefore a adequate knowledge of common pitfalls and technique limitations it is essential to provide reliable measurements and avoid altered estimates.

Learning Objectives

This presentation will focus on the following questions:
• How to acquire the appropriate phase contrast sequence (Velocity encoding value, plane orientation) for flow assessment?
• How to prevent the most common errors in acquisition or assessment?
• How to verify that our measurements are reliable?
• In what clinical conditions does an accurate flow measurement have impact in patient management?

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Dr. Nicola Galea, MD PhD, is a 36-years-old man, board radiologist dedicated to cardiac imaging (CT and MRI). He graduated in Medicine and Surgery in 2006, he completed his radiology residency program in 2011 and he obtained PhD diploma in Cardiovascular Imaging in 2015, at the “Sapienza” University of Rome. Visiting fellowship in 2011 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City (NY).

From 2017 he is a Temporary Researcher in Radiology at the Department of Experimental Medicine of the “Sapienza” University of Rome.

Since 2007, his professional and research activities lies on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with special focus on: inflammatory, ischemic and metabolic myocardial diseases; 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging of aorta after surgery; developing novel algorithms for the MR images analysis (perfusion, parametric mapping, ECV extraction); clinical-pathological-genetic-radiological correlations in familiar cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases.
He is author and co-author of more than 40 scientific papers and book chapters and recipient of various research grants.
From 2017 he is Secretary of Italian College of Cardiac Imaging endorsed by Italian Society of Radiology (SIRM).
European Board of Cardiac Radiology (EBCR) Diploma endorsed by ESCR in 2014.
He is full member of European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR) from 2011 and attends the ESCR annual conference from 2007.

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Modern techniques for Cardiac CT: Anatomy or function or both?“
Moderator: Dr. Maja Hrabak-Paar (Zagreb/HR)

"Assessment of coronary stenosis and FFR"

Speaker TBC

"CT perfusion"

Prof. Rozemarijn Vliegenthart, Groningen/NL

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Many CTA-derived coronary stenoses do not cause ischemia. To determine the hemodynamic significance of a stenosis, the “downstream” blood supply is evaluated in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) techniques. Cardiac CT allows for anatomical and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease in one examination by adding CTMPI. There are two main CTMPI techniques to image myocardial ischemia, namely static and dynamic imaging. Dynamic CTMPI enables the quantification of myocardial blood flow, which may have particular advantages in f.e. multivessel disease. In recent years, numerous studies have shown the diagnostic accuracy of CT for assessment of myocardial ischemia, and the improvement of specificity for hemodynamically significant CAD compared to CTA alone. The lecture will include discussion of the current clinical status of CTMPI.

Learning Objectives

• To understand the potential value of CT perfusion
• To appreciate CT perfusion techniques
• To learn about the current clinical status of CT perfusion

About the speaker

Rozemarijn Vliegenthart studied medicine at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Groningen and obtained her MD degree (cum laude) in 2005. She obtained her PhD degree in 2003, and holds an MSc degree in Clinical Epidemiology. Vliegenthart works as a radiologist at the University Medical Center of Groningen. Research interests include validation and application of new techniques in cardiothoracic CT/MRI, centered on coronary artery disease, lung cancer and COPD. She has acquired a number of grants in cardiothoracic imaging as (co-)applicant. Vliegenthart is (co-)author on >180 scientific publications (H factor 37). She serves as Chairman of the cardiovascular section of the Dutch Radiology Society and as Secretary of the ESCR. Vliegenthart is Tenure track professor at the University of Groningen.

Webinars 2018

1. MR myocardial imaging revisited: the new myocardial toolbox of imaging biomarkers

Essentials

January 17, 2018 – 17:00 CET
Speaker: Prof. Jan Bogaert,  Leuven/BE

Moderator: Prof. Marco Francone, Rome/IT

Description

Old meets new or new meets old. In recent years, several novel imaging biomarkers have become available to image and to tissue characterize the myocardium at MR imaging. Already in the 1980s it was reported that ischemic myocardial injury alters T1 and T2 relaxation times in the jeopardized myocardium. These and other findings triggered the interest of researchers and clinicians to use MR imaging for myocardial tissue characterization. Whereas initially ‘weighted’ sequences were used for this purpose comparing alterations in tissue relaxation between normal and pathologic myocardium, nowadays it has become possible to quantify T1,T2 and T2* relaxation times at voxel base and to estimate the myocardial interstitial space (i.e., ECV – extracellular volume). As such MR imaging allows deep phenotyping of myocardium which has led to a paradigm shift in approaching myocardial pathology.

Learning objectives

1. To become familiar with the different MR imaging approaches to tissue characterize the myocardium. To learn about the strengths, weaknesses and potential pitfalls of these techniques
2. To learn about the link MR imaging biomarkers and pathology
3. To learn how to use these novel imaging biomarkers in clinical practice

About the speaker

Jan Bogaert has been in the field of non-invasive cardiac imaging for almost 25 years. His main interest has always been integration of CMR into clinical practice. Tom Dresselaers is a cardiac MR physicist, starting his career in small-animal research in the late nineties, recently stepped over to clinical imaging and research.

2. ARVD - often suspected, rarely diagnosed, newly revised

Essentials

February 14, 2018 – 17:00 CET
Speaker: Prof. Jean-Nicolas Dacher, Rouen/FR
Moderator: Prof. Karl-Friedrich Kreitner, Mainz/DE

Description

The lecture will start with some general concepts about ARVD, a rare and difficult to diagnose genetic disease.
The current diagnostic criteria will be covered, with special emphasis on MR ones.
We will insist on the various methods (and tracks) available for evaluating the right ventricular systolic function; some aspects from the literature will be given as well as our home technique.
A series of cases of proven ARVD will be shown followed by some cases of differential diagnosis.

Learning objectives

1. Get basic knowledge about pathophysiology, genetics and cardiac complications of ARVD,
2. Become familiar with current diagnostic criteria and the role of MRI in the diagnosis of ARVD,
3. Know how to evaluate the systolic function of the right ventricle,
4. Become familiar with the major differentials

About the speaker

My own name is Jean Nicolas Dacher, I am 57 years old.
I am an academic cardiac radiologist, working in Rouen as Chief of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (University Hospital of Rouen). I am a member of the INSERM unit U1096 (A research laboratory of Cardiovascular Pharmacology attached to the University of Rouen – Normandy). I am involved in Cardiac CT and MRI (adults and children).
My main fields of interest encompass myocardial characterization, Cardiac CT, valvular diseases (aortic stenosis) and congenital cardiopathies. I am of course a member of various societies including ESR, ESCR, SFR and SFICV (French Society of cardiovascular Imaging).

3. The role of MRI in ischemic cardiomyopathy

Essentials

March 14, 2018  – 17:00 CET
Speaker: Prof. Luigi Natale, Rome/IT
Moderator: Dr. Alexandros Kallifatidis, Thessaloniki/GR

Description

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR), due to its morphologic, functional and tissue characterization capabilities,  is an excellent tool to explore all the aspects of ischemic heart disease.
Its tridimensional approach, coupled with the most recent accelerated techniques, allows its use  also in “acute” patients, that in the past were not able to tolerate a 1-hour examination.

Learning objectives

The webinar will be focused on three main topics:
1. Ischemia detection,
2. Acute myocardial infarction,
3. Viability assessment in the setting of chronic left ventricle dysfunction.

For each topic, technical improvements, imaging features, imaging biomarkers, prognosticators, and major published and ungoing studies, with final considerations on indications and guidelines, will be discussed.

About the speaker

Prof. Luigi Natale, Rome/IT
Born in Caserta, Italy, 10/02/1960.
Medical degree in 1985, board certified in Radiology in 1989, in Catholic University of Sacred Heart School of Medicine of Rome.
Fellow and then aggregate professor of Radiology in Radiology Dept. of the same Univeristy.
Clinical practice in Policlinico A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome up to 2010, in Centro Oncologico Fiorentino of Florence from 2011 to 2012 and then in Complesso Integrato Columbus, Catholic University in Rome up to now.
Professor of Cardiac Radiology in Radiology, Cardiology and in Cardiac Surgery post-graduate Schools of Catholic University of Sacred Heart.
Professor of Cross-Section Imaging anatomy in School for Radiographers of Catholic University of Sacred Heart from 2008 to 2012.
In 1991 he attended Cardiac MR unit of Royal Brompton Heart and Lung Insitute of London, UK, for six months.
Then he attended cardiac MR courses of American Heart Association in 1995 and 1997 and cardiac MR course of European Heart Association in 1996.
In 2001 he visited the cardiac MR unit of Univeristy of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, directed by dr. Gerald Pohost.
Chief of cardio-vascular MR unit of Catholic University of Rome from 1997 to 2011.
Chief of MRI unit of Catholic Univrsity of Rome from 2003 to 2011.
Author of 75 papers published on indexed journals, 35 of them with IF, 1 book , 9 chapters of books and other 35 papers published on non indexed journals.
Speaker in many national and international congresses, workshops and courses, mainly in cardiac imaging field.
Member of many international scientific Society: RSNA, ARRS, ECR, ESMRMB, AHA, SCMR, SCCT, NASCI, ESCR, ESTI.
Active member of cardiac imaging group of Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) and Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC).
Past president of Cardiac Radiology Working Group of the Italian Society of Cardiac Radiology.
Previous chief of the Educational Committee and actual secretary of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology.
Member of the Educational Exhibit Cardiac Subcommittee of Radiological Society of North America from 2011 to 2014.
Chair of Cardiac Radiology Committee in the 2012 European Congress of Radiology.
Body CT and MRI, Chest Radiology, Cardiac Radiology and Oncologic Radiology are his fields in clnical practice.
His research field is mainly represented by cardiac MRI, with focus on ischemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies and valvular heart diseases, and oncologic imaging, with focus on perfusion and diffusion MRI for the treatment response assessment.

4. The transplanted heart

Essentials

April 11, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Prof. Matthias Gutberlet, Leipzig/DE
Moderator: Dr. Riccardo Marano, Rome/IT

Description

Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) is still considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute cellular rejection (ACR) after orthotopic heart transplantation (HTx), which is one of the initial complications of HTx and might be detected non-invasively with CMR using similar techniques like in myocarditis. The detection of even subclinical ACR might be important, because repeated subclinical ACRs are known to trigger the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), a major long-term cause of graft failure after HTx. CAV might be detected with MDCT earlier as compared to invasive coronary angiography (ICA).

Learning objectives

– To learn about the clinical features of HTx patients
– To learn about the different CMR techniques used to detect ACR
– To learn about the different CT-techniques to assess CAV

About the speaker

Professor Matthias Gutberlet, MD, PhD, EBCR is currently Chair of Radiology at the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology at the Heart Center Leipzig -University of Leipzig, Germany. He received his medical degree from the Philipps-University Marburg, Germany. After residency in Cardiology at the German Heart Center in Berlin he joined the Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the Charité Berlin, Germany in 1995, where he completed Residency in Radiology 2000 and Nuclear Medicine in 2003. Till his appointment as Professor for Cardiovascular Imaging at the University of Leipzig in 2007 he worked as a Senior Consultant and Associate Professor of Radiology at the Charité in Berlin.

5. The differential of late enhancement in acute chest pain: -itis or not

Essentials

May 16, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Dr. Charles Peebles, Southampton/UK
Moderator: Dr. Rodrigo Salgado, Edegem/BE

Description

Cardiac MRI has a well-established role in the differentiation of ischaemic cardiomyopathy from non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Increasingly it is now being used to assess the cause of acute chest pain, particularly in patients with positive troponin levels but normal coronary arteries. In many such cases the diagnosis can be reached easily but it is not always ‘black and white’. This lecture will explore the typical and atypical appearances of myocarditis and ischaemic myocardial injury and the role for CMR in these patients.

Learning objectives

1) Typical appearances of acute MI on CMR
2) Typical appearances of acute myocarditis on CMR
3) Standard CMR protocols for acute chest pain imaging
4) How to approach difficult cases

About the speaker

Dr Charles Peebles is a Consultant Radiologist at the University Hospital Southampton with a specialist interest in Cardiothoracic imaging. He has a specific expertise in cardiac cross sectional imaging and is lead of the Department of Cardiothoracic Radiology at Southampton. He has been performing CMR since 1995 and Cardiac CT since 1999.

Charles has previously been the President of the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, and has been a board member of the British Society of Cardiovascular MRI. He currently serves on the executive committee of the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology. He has been an advisor on the UK NICE guideline committee for Acute chest pain and previously sat on the guideline development group for the management of stable angina.

6. Imaging of carotid artery vulnerable plaque

Essentials

June 13, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Dr. Rodrigo Salgado, Edegem/BE
Moderator: Prof. Luca Saba, Cagliari/IT

Description

Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, causing between 10-20% of cerebral strokes and transient ischemic attacks. Following the results of large clinical trials, stratification of patients with carotid artery disease between optimal medical therapy and surgical intervention is traditionally based in the degree of luminal narrowing. As such, imaging of the carotid arteries to quantify stenosis forms today a routine examination performed in every mainstream radiology department. While imaging screening is mostly done using Doppler ultrasound, CT and MR play an important role in the further work-up of these patients, confirming the degree of stenosis but also visualizing the different plaque components.
Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that, in partial analogy with coronary artery disease, unstable carotid artery plaques can also rupture with subsequent embolization, causing ischemic stroke regardless of the degree of stenosis. During this lecture, we will review the current status on non-invasive imaging of carotid artery disease, and explore the complex relation between luminal narrowing, plaque composition and stability, and the occurrence of cerebral ischemia and stroke.

Learning objectives

1. Understand the pathophysiology and risk factors for carotid artery disease
2. Review the different methods to visualize and quantify carotid artery stenosis
3. Understand the significance of and the methods for non-invasive imaging of the different carotid artery plaque components and the features of vulnerability.
4. Review how imaging findings can be incorporated in clinical decision making.

About the speaker

Dr. Rodrigo Salgado is a consultant radiologist at the Antwerp University Hospital and staff member at the Holy Heart Hospital Lier, and current president of the non-invasive cardiovascular imaging section of the Belgian Society of Radiology. He has a special expertise in non-invasive cardiovascular imaging with CT and MR, with focus on emerging CT/MR imaging technologies and non-invasive imaging evaluation of cardiovasculair interventions. In this capacity, and also as an executive board member of the ESCR, he enjoys teaching and promoting non-invasive cardiovascular imaging to residents and other radiologists through lectures and workshops at national and international meetings.

7. Well trained or too much: the hypertrophic phenotype

Essentials

September 12, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Prof. Marco Francone, Rome/IT
Moderator: Prof. Christian Loewe, Vienna/AT

Description

Left ventricular hypertrophy encompasses a large and heterogeneous number of affections, characterized by the common phenotypic expression of pathological single or biventricular thickening.
Present webinar will aim to review tips and tricks for discriminating between various conditions, including the complex entity of the athletes’ heart, in which extensive training and adaptative mechanisms may sometime lead to the so-called “grey zone” of hypetrophy/dilatation which highly overlaps with mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Role of modern CMR techniques in this specific setting will be also discussed, including T1 and T2 mapping and the importance of ECV quantification.

Learning objectives

1) To review importance of correct phenotypic recognition in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy understanding respective functional and morphological changes characterizing different stages of diseases.
2) To understand complexity and heterogeneity of genotypes underlying apparently similar phenotypic forms of disease correlating pathological changes with CMR imaging findings.
3) To recognize common and less common signal intensity abnormalities and late enhancement patterns to provide etiological differentiation of the various forms of cardiomyopathies.
4) to discuss imaging-based preferable approach for discriminating into the “grey zone” of hypetrophy, consisting with an overlap of features between athletes and pathological patients.
5) To review prognostic implications of CMR-derived imaging biomarkers in dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

About the speaker

Prof. Marco Francone is Professor of Radiology at Sapienza University of Rome.
He is an internationally known expert in cardiac imaging and speaker for most important international radiological and cardiological meetings including CIRSE, ESOR, RSNA, ECR, ESCR and the American college of cardiology. His prominent field of research is cardiovascular imaging with both CT and MR with specific focus on myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathies being author and coauthor of more than 100 indexed articles with an impact factor higher than 500.
Prof. Francone is also scientific chairman of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR and was recently elected as President Italian College of Cardiac Radiology – Italian Society of Radiology.
He is also actively involved in the activities of European Society of Radiology, having served as cardiac imaging subcommittee member for the European Congress of Radiology between 2017-2019 and was recently appointed as Scientific Subcommittee Chairperson for the 2020 meeting.
He is also member of ESR Research Committee, since 2020.
Refresher courser at RSNA for the years 2017-18 and member of the Educational Exhibit Awards committee and Radiographics panelist at RSNA 2015-2018.

8. The oncological heart

Essentials

October 17, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Dr. Antonio Esposito, Milan/IT
Moderator: Prof. Tim Leiner, Utrecht/NL

Description

The heart is an underestimated site of distant metastasis of different solid tumours. The diffusion of very fast CT scanners, which provide flawless images of the heart also without cardiac synchronization, together with the increased use of hybrid imaging (PET/CT, PET/MR) in the staging and follow-up of different solid cancer, have improved our capability to detect cardiac metastasis. Primary cardiac tumours are rare and more frequently benign. Cardiac MR and CT imaging have a fundamental role in the differential diagnosis of cardiac masses and in the characterization of primary cardiac tumours. Particularly, the non-invasive differentiation of the benign or malignant nature and the accurate definition of the relationship of the mass with the different cardiac structures and tissues, represent fundamental information for the most appropriate management of the single patient. This lecture will explore the MR and CT role and capability in this setting.

Learning objectives

– Prevalence of different cardiac masses
– Appropriate MR and CT protocols to study the heart in case of suspected cardiac masses
– Differential diagnosis of cardiac masses with MR and CT

About the speaker

Antonio Esposito is Associate Professor of Radiology at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University and Deputy-Director of the Experimental Imaging Center of San Raffaele Scientific Institute (SRSI). He has long time experience in the field of body application of advanced imaging with MRI and CT, with a particular focus on cardiovascular applications. He developed an intensive clinical and preclinical research on these issues, with more than one hundred full papers published on highly impacted scientific journals. He is the responsible of cardiovascular imaging in the Department of Radiology of the and San Raffaele Hospital of Milan. He is also the responsible of the Preclinical Imaging Facility of the SRSI equipped with CT, MRI, Optical and US imaging technologies for the experimental study of small animal models of diseases. He leads a multidisciplinary team of researcher working in the facility, including radiologists, physicists, bioengineers, biologists and technicians.

9. The dilated heart

Essentials

November 14, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Prof. Alexis Jacquier, Marseille/FR
Moderator: Prof. Iacopo Carbone, Rome/IT

Description

In this webinar, we will focus on how to deal with a patient with a dilated left ventricle. Discrimination between pathological dilatation and LV remodeling in highly trained athletes require specific parameters. We will precisely define the phenotypes linked with specific diseases such as left ventricular non-compaction, Duchenne and Becker dystrophy and others. Finally, we will discuss the surrogate marker of cardiac events brought by CMR notably LGE and mapping technique.

Learning objectives

– To define abnormal LV chamber dilatation
– To know how to define the left ventricular hypertrabeculation phenotype
– To know how to assess prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy using CMR

About the speaker

Prof. Alexis Jacquier is a cardiac radiologist in hospital de la Timone, Marseille, France. He trained in Marseille and Lyon in cardiac radiology and do is PHD program in San Francisco (CA) USA with Maythem Saeed and Charles Higgins. Since 2006 he integrates the CEMEREM research lab (http://crmbm.univ-amu.fr) in the Cardiovascular group. He has a special interest in cardiac MRI. He has authored or co-authored more than 90 peer-reviewed publications and has given numerous invited lectures, tutorials and refresher courses at national and international meetings. From 2014 to 2017 he was chairman of the membership committee of the ESCR. He was the pas chairman of the program planning committee for cardiac imaging at the ECR 2018. Now he has the vice president position in the French Society of Cardio-Vascular Radiology (Société Française d’imagerie cardiovasculaire, SFICV).

10. Acute aortic diseases: not an obvious diagnosis

Essentials

December 12, 2018 – 17:00 CEST
Speaker: Prof. Christian Loewe, Vienna/AT
Moderator: Dr. Olivier Ghekiere, Liège/BE

Description

Acute aortic diseases represent a rather rare but highly “malignant” condition. Without immediate and appropriate treatment, prognosis is dismal.
In this presentation, the image based diagnosis of acute aortic diseases will be discussed and state-of-the-art imaging techniques for CT angiography and MR imaging will be introduced. The most relevant image-derived biomarkers for treatment decision making and for follow up will be discussed as well. Treatment indications should be explained based on clinical cases in the view of newly established treatment guidelines with a special focus on the challenges with “complicated” aortic dissections and the inherent challenges for imaging.

Learning objectives

  1. To become familiar with the definition of acute aortic syndrome
  2. To learn about the most important imaging derived biomarkers in patients suffering from acute aortic diseases
  3. To become familiar with the optimized imaging strategy in acute aortic syndromes
  4. To learn about the traditional definition of “complicated type-B dissections” and their practical limitations

About the speaker

1. Education
since 12/2016 Head of the Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Medical University of Vienna
since 10/2012 chairman of the Austrian Board of Radiology
10/2011 EBCR (European Board of Cardiac Radiology)
since 10/2006 Vice-Head of the Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Medical University of Vienna
09/2006 Board Certified Radiologist
since 2004 Programme Director »Cardiovascular Imaging«
since 2004 Staff Radiologist on the Dep. for Angiography and Interventional Radiology, University of Vienna
2004 Associate Professor for Radiology; topic: »non-invasive diagnosis of pAVK by means of contrast enhanced MR angiography«
1999 – 2005 Residency training in Radiology at the Department of Radiology, University of Vienna
1998 – 1999 Research fellow at the Section of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Vienna
1996–1998 Research fellow at the Institute of Electronmicroscopy and Micromorphology, University of Vienna
29/05/1996 Graduation „MD“
1989 – 1996 Study of medicine, University of Vienna, Austria

2. Professional Activities and Memberships
• Since 2008 member of the Institutional Review Board of the Medical University of Vienna
• Secretary of the Austrian Roentgen society (OERG) (2006 – 2012)
• Chairman of the Austrian Board of Radiology (since 2012)
• Chairman of the Educational Committee European Society of Cardiac Radiology since 2014
• Chairman of the European Board of Cardiac Radiology (EBCR) since 2014
• Congress President of the Annual Meeting of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology 2015
• Secretary of the Austrian Society of Interventional Radiology (OEGIR) (since 2011)
• Founder of Vienna Heart
• Chairman of the „vascular subcommittees“, ECR 2010
• Member of the Steering Committee of the European School of Radiology (ESOR)
• Chairman of the Postgraduate Committee of the ECR 2019

3. Scientific work
• main focus of clinical and scientific work non-invasive cardiovascular diagnostic (MSCT and MRT of the heart; CT angiography; MR angiography)
• more than 350 invited lectures
• more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals
• 5 book chapters
• associate editor of Radiology (till 2018); member of the editorial board of Radiology, Insights Into Imaging, International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
• reviewer for European Radiology, Circulation Imaging, European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, Radiology, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (CVIR)

ESOR (European School of Radiology)

ESCR is happy to announce its collaboration with the European School of Radiology (ESOR) – an institution, fulfilling the mission of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) in the field of education. One of its main goals is to assist in harmonising radiological education in Europe. With its wide range of activities ESOR additionally aims to raise standards in the field of scientific radiology, to extend and coordinate teaching resources worldwide and to help young radiologists to achieve the knowledge and skills to fulfil tomorrow’s requirements.

For more information about ESOR activities, please visit the official website.

CARDIOVASCULAR SCHOLARSHIP

Application for 2019

February 25th – March 11th, 2019

More information

For more information on how to apply, please visit the ESOR website.

Aim

The ESOR Visiting Scholarship Programme (Europe) offers qualified trainees the opportunity to get to know another training environment and to kick off an interest for subspecialisation in radiology. During three months of training the scholars will be provided with a structured, modular introduction to different subspecialties and will be supervised by a specialised tutor in a pre-selected, highly esteemed academic training centre in Europe.

Number of available scholarships

During 2019, up to 36 scholarships are available on different topics and will be realised in partnership with Bracco and ESR. One additional scholarship for Spanish residents in partnership with the Spanish Foundation of Radiology and three scholarships for Greek residents supported by the Hellenic Radiological Society will be offered. Furthermore, two of the available scholarships will be provided for residents from Georgia within the ESR Support Initiative.

Eligibility

1. These scholarships apply to residents in their 3rd, 4th or 5th year of training in radiology who desire to get the benefit of a mentored modular training of a specific subspecialised topic in radiology.
2. Completion of the training curriculum from at least the first two years of residency is required, verified by the head of the department. Competence in producing a radiological report and communicating with clinicians and patients is appreciated, as well as knowledge of the principles of administration and management applied to a clinical department with multi-disciplinary staff and high-cost equipment.
3. Previous exposure in any field of special interest, including basic knowledge of imaging methods, indications for imaging and clinical expectations, is advantageous.
4. Applicants must be proficient in English.
5. ESR membership fees for 2019 must be settled.

Applicants who were selected for this programme or the Visiting Scholarship Programme USA in the past cannot be considered again.

Duration of scholarships and funding

The training will start in the second half of the year and last for three months. The scholar will receive a grant (€3.500,-) upon completion of the training, delivery of a final report and submission of original flight tickets and accommodation receipts. The grant is intended to contribute in part to travel and accommodation expenses during the training period. ESOR cannot guarantee that the grant will cover these costs in full. During the period of the training the scholar is responsible for covering his/her expenses and his/her own health insurance. The training itself is offered for free. Please note that in particular cases administrative charges may arise, which are to be covered by the grant.

Programme structure

The programme offers a structured modular training in a highly esteemed training centre. The trainee will have the opportunity to follow and participate in the core knowledge training programme through tutorials and lectures, followed by hands-on teaching on routine clinical cases and/or modality techniques and protocols, led by an assigned tutor.

In non-native English speaking training centres teaching would be in English, while major radiological conferences and reporting may be in the local language. Some knowledge of the local language may be an advantage.

The trainee will be able to observe clinical activities, but will not have direct patient care responsibilities.

It is the trainee’s responsibility to communicate with the centre regarding the details of the training and whether more responsibilities than observer status can be obtained. ESOR solely acts as facilitator and coordinator between the training centre and the trainee.

Certification

After completion of the training programme, the resident receives a certificate from ESR/ESOR. In order to receive this, the scholar must present a written report about his/her work and activities during the programme.

CARDIOVASCULAR FELLOWSHIP

Application for 2019

February 25th – March 11th, 2019

More information

For more information on how to apply, please visit the ESOR website.

Aim

Recent advances in CT and MR technology and clinical research have rapidly expanded the range of applications of these imaging modalities, particularly in imaging of the heart.

The need to sufficiently qualify further young radiologists to render confident diagnosis in cardiovascular radiology using multi-detector CT and MRI studies, led the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR) to take the initiative in establishing an exchange programme for fellowships or subspecialisation training in cardiovascular radiology.

It offers an opportunity to complement subspecialisation training in cardiovascular radiology or an existing structured fellowship programme, through exchange, in this field of radiology. Through three months of training the trainee will be provided with intense modular training in cardiovascular radiology and will be supervised by a specialised tutor in a pre-selected, highly esteemed, academic training centre in Europe.

Number of available places

During 2019, two places will be offered and organised through ESOR and the successful applicant will receive a grant jointly provided by ESR/ESOR and ESCR.

Eligibility

1. The programme applies to radiologists within the first three years after certification, who desire to become subspecialist radiologists.
2. Basic knowledge of current clinical practice in radiology with regard to CT and MRI. Competence in producing a radiological report, in communication with clinicians and patients, and knowledge of the principles of administration and management applied to a clinical department with multi-disciplinary staff and high-cost equipment is essential. Understanding the medicolegal implications of uncertainty and errors in diagnostic radiology is necessary. A clinical background in other disciplines, which has been achieved through clinical experience and training prior to entering the fellowship. Clinical experience in cardiology, angiology or cardiovascular surgery is advantageous.
3. Applicants must be proficient in English.
4. ESR and ESCR membership fees for 2019 must be settled.

Applicants who were selected for this programme in the past cannot be considered for a second time.

Duration and funding

The training will start in the second half of the year and last for three months. The fellow will receive a grant (€3.500,-) upon completion of the training, delivery of a final report and submission of original flight tickets and accommodation receipts. The grant is intended to contribute in part to travel and accommodation expenses during the training period. ESOR cannot guarantee that the grant will cover these costs in full. During the period of the training the fellow is responsible for covering his/her expenses and his/her own health insurance. The training itself is offered for free. Please note that in particular cases administrative charges may arise, which are to be covered by the grant.

Programme structure

Based on weekly training programme modules, the trainee will familiarise him/herself with the institution’s imaging equipment. He/She will then learn data handling and post-processing at different workstations, followed by case-by-case hands-on teaching on routine clinical cases with different modalities offered by an experienced staff.

With reviewing at least 100 cardiac cases that require CT and/or MRI evaluation at the end of the training programme, the trainee should be fluent in discussing the appropriate imaging modality and imaging technique with referring clinicians and be able to interpret different cardiac examinations on his/her own.

In non-native English speaking training centres teaching would be in English, while major radiological conferences and reporting may be in the local language. Some knowledge of the local language may be an advantage.

The trainee will be able to observe clinical activities, but will not have direct patient care responsibilities.

It is the trainee’s responsibility to communicate with the centre regarding the details of the training and whether more responsibilities than observer status can be obtained. ESOR solely acts as facilitator and coordinator between the training centre and the trainee.

Certification

After successful completion of the three-month training the trainees receive a certificate from ESR/ESOR and ESCR. In order to receive this, the fellow must present a written report about his/her work and activities during the programme.

JOURNALS

The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging (iJCVI)

 

The journal can be ordered with your Membership application or Membership payment.

Reduced price for ESCR members: 50€ (online version)

EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY

 

The flagship journal of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) continuously updates scientific knowledge in clinical radiology by publishing original research articles of general interest and importance as well as state-of-the-art reviews, and short communications written by leading radiologists.

Members of the ESR receive free electronic access to the journal, which is Europe’s No.1 journal for general radiology.

More information at www.european-radiology.org

 

INSIGHTS INTO IMAGING

 

This online gold open access journal specialises on critical reviews, guidelines and policy statements, and is dedicated to education and strategies in radiology.

Article Processing Charges for publication in Insights into Imaging are covered for all corresponding authors who are active members of the ESR.

More information at www.i3-journal.org

 

EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY EXPERIMENTAL

 

The youngest member of the ESR journal family concentrates on basic scientific discoveries, novel approaches and techniques in experimental settings in the field of medical imaging. It is an online gold open access journal.

Article Processing Charges for publication in European Radiology Experimental are covered for all corresponding authors who are active members of the ESR.

More information at www.er-x.org